Historical NFL Scouting Combine Data

The Best Wonderlic Scores In NFL Combine History

The Wonderlic Cognitive Ability Test™ is used at the NFL Combine to measure players problem solving abilities.   See more detailed information about the Wonderlic Exam here.

Harvard’s Ryan Fitzpatrick owns the highest Wonderlic score for a QB ever recorded at an NFL Combine with a score of 48.  Alamaba’s Greg McElroy was rumored to have scored a 48 in 2011, but it was later found that he had scored a 43 which is the second best score in NFL history.

The Top Combine Quarterback Wonderlic Scores in NFL History:

  1. 48 – Ryan Fitzpatrick (2005)
  2. 43 – Greg McElroy (2011)
  3. 43 – Jason Maas (1999)
  4. 42 – Blaine Gabbert (2011)
  5. 41 – Kevin Barnes (2009)
  6. 40 – Darrell Hackney (2006)
  7. 40 – Alex Smith (2005)
  8. 39 – Todd Husak (2000)
  9. 39 – Aaron Rodgers (2005)
  10. 39 – Eli Manning (2004)
  11. 38 – Matthew Stafford (2009)
  12. 38 – Matt Flynn (2008)
  13. 38 – Omar Jacobs (2006)
  14. 38 – Craig Krenzel (2004)
  15. 38 – Charlie Frye (2005)

At the time of this writing, 6 of the top 15 names on this list are current active NFL starters (Fitzpatrick, Gabbert, Smith, Rodgers, Manning, Stafford) with another sure to get a legitimate shot at starting in the near future (Flynn).

Other Notable Wonderlic Scores:

  1. 36 – Sam Bradford (2010)
  2. 35 – Christian Ponder (2011)
  3. 33 – Tom Brady (2000)
  4. 32 – Matt Ryan (2008)
  5. 30 – Matt Schaub (2004)
  6. 30 – Tony Romo (2003)
  7. 30 – Philip Rivers (2004)
  8. 29 – Andy Dalton (2011)
  9. 28 – Drew Brees (2001)
  10. 28 – Mark Sanchez (2009)
  11. 27 – Josh Freeman (2009)
  12. 27 – Joe Flacco (2008)
  13. 26 – Jay Cutler – (2006)
  14. 22 – Tim Tebow (2010)
  15. 21 – Cam Newton (2011)

It is increasingly common for starting QBs to have scored better and better on the Wonderlic exam. This may be due to several factors including increased pre-draft preparation by the players, an increased value placed on Wonderlic scores by NFL teams on draft day, and an increased likelihood of success for highly intelligent Quarterbacks.

*A high Wonderlic score does not necessarily indicate intelligence, nor does a low Wonderlic score indicate a lack of intelligence.

 

 

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